Top 10 Quiet Riot Songs

Quiet Riot Songs

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Our Top 10 Quiet Riot Songs takes a look at a band that released their first two albums in 1977 and 1978. The albums were only released in Japan. The records featured guitarist Randy Rhodes who would late gain great recognition as the guitarist in Ozzy Osbourne’s band before Rhodes passed away in a plane accident. Quiet Riot’s third album and first international released entitled Metal Health was released in 1983. The Metal Health album turned the band into heavy metal stars . Based on the commercial success of Quiet Riot’s cover of the Slade song, “Cum On Feel The Noize,” Quiet Riot became a household name in 1983.

Quiet Riot”s follow up album in 1984 entitled Critical Condition contained another huge hit. The song “Mama We’re All Crazy Now,” bulleted up the charts helping cementing the band Quiet Riot as one of the most successful rock bands of the 1980’s along with groups such as The Scorpions, Judas Priest, and Motley Crew. Once again a cover of a Slade song proved to be extremely successful for the band.

Quiet Riot was never able to match the commercial success they had with the albums Metal Health and Critical Condition. The band contained to released great rock records, but none of their singles even charted on the U.S. Billboard charts after 1984. The albums QR III and QR released in 1986 and 1988 were the last Quiet Riot albums to even chart on the Billboard Top 100 albums charts.

The band’s lack of commercial success in the 1990’s and 2000’s had nothing to do with the band releasing poor albums. In fact, some of the bands records from the 1990’s were some of their strongest from a musical and artistic standpoint. Many of the metal hair bands of the 1980’s struggled in the 1990s in  the wake of the grunge scene when bands like Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden were enjoying incredible success with their dark depressing rock records.

Our Top 10 Quiet Riot songs list takas a look at the band’s entire career. While we could not ignore the popular Quiet Riot songs from Metal Health and Critical Condition, our list also showcases some of the great material the band released on some of their post 1980’s work.

# 10 – Free

We open up our top 10 Quiet Riot songs with the smoking track “Free.” The song was released on the band’s 2006 album Rehab. The album stands as one of the band’s strongest records from an artistic standpoint. Sadly, it also represents Kevin DuBrow’s last Quiet Riot album as the band’s legendary lead singer passed away in 2007.

# 9 – Run For Cover

It did not take long for this Top 10 Quiet Riot songs list to get to the Metal Health album. One of our favorite Quiet Riot songs from the album has always been the killer track “Run For Cover.” The song was written by lead singer Kevin DuBrow and guitarist Carlos Cavazo.

# 8 – Terrified

In 1993, Quiet Riot released the album Terrified. It was the first Quiet Riot album in ten years not to chart on the Billboard 100. That was a shame because Terrified was a terrific album. The title track will knock you off your chair.

# 7 – Stay With Me Tonight

The Quiet Riot song “Stay With Me Tonight,” is an outlier on this top 10 Quiet Riot songs list because it’s the only song to not feature the vocals of Kevin Dubrow. The band hired Paul Shortino of Rough Cut to replace the fired Kevin Dubrow. However, the replacement was short lived as far as studio albums go as Dubrow returned for the band’s next album.

# 6 – Slick Black Cadillac

While the brilliant guitarist Randy Rhoads was no longer in the band when Quiet Riot recorded and released the Metal Health album, the iconic guitarist was still due some royalties for the album’s success. That’s because Randy Rhoads served as co-songwriter on the song “Slick Black Cadillac.” The song had originally been first released on the band’s second Japanese release Quite Riot II in 1978.

# 5 – Party All Night

Quiet Riot’s “Party All Night,” was released on the album Critical Condition . It was the album’s second single release after  “Mama We’re All Crazy Now.”

# 4 – The Wild and the Young

The great Quiet Riot song “The Wild and The Young,” was released on the album QR III. It was a strange album title because in reality, it was the band’s fifth album.

# 3 – Mama Weer All Crazee Now

It’s amazing how a song can reach number 1 in one country while barely breaking the top 100 in another. In 1972, Slade had a number one hit in the UK with “Mama Weer All Crazee Now.” The song barely broke the U.S. Hot 100 peaking in the 70s. Nonetheless, 14 years later Quiet Riot resurrected the song and had a huge hit with “Mama Weer All Crazee Now” as it became a top 20 hit in the States.

# 2 – Come On Feel The Noize

If it were not for this song, we might not be writing this article. “Come On Feel The Noize,” was the song that brought the band fame, fortune, glory and a spot on the soundtrack to many 90s and 2000s video games.  The Quiet Riot song “Come On Feel The Noize,” would turn out to be the biggest hit of their career, The song peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1983.

# 1 –  Metal Health (Bang Your Head)

The title track and opening number to the band’s legendary album Metal Health comes in as our favorite Quiet Riot song of all time. The song was written by lead singer Kevin DuBrow, guitarist Carlos Cavazo and drummer Frankie Banali.

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